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‘AV’ is no way to clean up politics

ELECTORAL reform isn’t the way to clean up politics, according to an opponent of the Alternate Vote (AV).

ELECTORAL reform isn’t the way to clean up politics, according to an opponent of the Alternate Vote (AV).

Conservative campaigner, Maggie Throup, is calling for people to keep the first-past-the-post system.

The Shirley resident has been picked as one of the Tories’ spokesmen in the run-up to a referendum on the issue.

Last Friday, she was in Solihull High Street with fellow members of the “vote no” camp.

“Changing to AV would make Nick Clegg a permanent kingmaker,” said Ms Throup.

“This would be the end of strong single-party governments and would mean constant coalitions.

“This means behind-the-scenes deals with politicians instead of parties delivering the manifestos they promised.

“We have a coalition now but that’s formed in the national interest and came out of very specific circumstances.”

Those who support a change argue that AV will make MPs work harder to hold their seat.

Ms Throup denied this, saying there would still be hundreds of safe seats in the House of Commons.

“I think our message is that people can’t afford to ignore this referendum, it’s hugely important,” she said.

“Eighty years ago suffragettes died for the principle of each person having a vote - AV would put an end to that.

“Under the system, those who vote for smaller parties will have their vote counted several times.”

Brian Holmes, from St Alphege, said that his main concern was the money being spent on a referendum.

“We’re in an economic mess and getting out of that should be the priority,” said the 68-year-old.

 

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