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Dave Pinwell asks if it's crunch time for Apple

IS the Apple losing its shine? Having announced its first fall in profits for a decade and seen its share price plunge from $705 in September to $460 now, the question is being asked across the industry.

IS the Apple losing its shine? Having announced its first fall in profits for a decade and seen its share price plunge from $705 in September to $460 now, the question is being asked across the industry.

Since the iPhone was launched in 2007 and the iPad in 2010, the ‘wow’ factor has waned. The competition, particularly from Android devices, has caught up. The Samsung Galaxy range of phone and the Google Nexus tablets are just two leading brands underlining solid reputations, out-pricing Apple and selling in serious volume.

Commentators are noticing that since the sad passing of its founder and innovator-in-chief, Steve Jobs, Apple has taken no further strides forward.

With those who upgraded from an iPhone 4 to an iPhone 5 still wondering why and the Apple Maps fiasco looming large in the memory, shareholders are concerned how long has passed since the last bumper crop on Apple’s tree.

Since the old days, when the Apple Mac, as an expensive but superior alternative to the PC, dominated the media industries, there have always been enthusiasts who would not countenance touching anything else. These devotees have grown in number and could not imagine life without an iPod in its dock, iPhone in the pocket, iPad in the briefcase and Mac on the desk. But, unless Apple yields a fresh and exciting new crop soon, that sweet taste will be a faded memory.

Under pressure CEO, Tim Cook, responded to the profits dip by hyping up the autumn to blow our minds with innovative new products. If he is to stay in charge of the orchard, the harvest will need to be a bumper one.

 

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