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Dave Pinwell's IT talk

THE storm that blew up around 17-year-old Paris Brown and her resignation as Kent’s Youth Crime Commissioner, threw the spotlight on the business of how personal remarks made in social media relate to employment aspirations.

THE storm that blew up around 17-year-old Paris Brown and her resignation as Kent’s Youth Crime Commissioner, threw the spotlight on the business of how personal remarks made in social media relate to employment aspirations.

Some observers criticised the Commissioner’s office for not vetting her Twitter account before offering the job. However, various legal eagles were then quick to suggest that to reject candidates on the basis of social media content risks infringing discrimination laws.

Last year, a survey by the international ‘social media monitoring service’; Reppler, discovered that 91 per cent of corporate recruiters included a look at a candidate’s Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn pages as a part of their vetting process. However, if that makes you consider steering clear of social media, be aware of another report which concluded that an absence of a social media presence increasingly made people suspicious.

We all need to be aware that people we are about to meet for the first time, not just in a recruitment scenario, may be checking us out online.

They may decide in advance whether they like the cut of our jib in our photo, or wonder why we don’t post one, and draw conclusions about us. With social media, we may be damned if we do, and if we don’t.

 

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