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Gate putting end to speedy exits

TROUBLESOME youths hoping for a quick getaway have been foiled with the installation of a ‘kissing gate’ on a public footpath.

TROUBLESOME youths hoping for a quick getaway have been foiled with the installation of a ‘kissing gate’ on a public footpath.

Monkspath residents complained about teenagers gathering in a nearby wooded area drinking alcohol, throwing objects at houses and stealing property ‘for sale’ signs.

The path allowed the youths a quick escape but a kissing gate, which only allows walkers through one at a time, has now been installed and proved an effective deterrent.

Resident Trevor Stokes, said: “The youngsters knew if they caused trouble they could swiftly disappear off into the woodland.

“Thanks to the new gate, though, they can’t make a quick exit - especially if they’re on bikes as they take more time to manoeuvre through the gate - and that alone has seen the anti-social behaviour eliminated almost over night.”

Blythe Neighbourhood Police Constable Lorraine Jones, said: “It’s a very simple, but very effective, deterrent and I’m delighted we’ve been able to relieve the problems that were causing a headache for many local residents.”

Solihull Council funded the kissing gate installation.

 

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