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No Sir, we have no primary males

ALMOST a quarter of primary schools in Solihull have no male teachers because they are not interested in the profession.

ALMOST a quarter of primary schools in Solihull have no male teachers because they are not interested in the profession.

Figures reveal that 15 of the 65 primary schools in the borough don’t have a single Sir.

And with single-parent families on the rise it means some children miss out on a male role model until the day they reach secondary school.

The problem is not just an issue in Solihull as it emerged that there are 4,587 schools across England without any male teachers.

Leader of Solihull Council, Ken Meeson says it is a worry especially with the rise in single parent families.

“We would like to see more male teachers in primary schools for sure,” said Councillor Meeson who is also cabinet member for education, children and young people.

“It’s traditional that women tend to dominate the teaching in primary schools but it is a worry that children are missing out on male role models.”

Coun Meeson says that males are more attracted to teaching secondary school subjects and admits that things need to change.

“More men need to apply for teacher training to help attract males into the profession.”

 

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