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Our Miracle

BORN with a life-threatening condition, many doctors thought there was nothing that could be done for Kelly Knight.

BORN with a life-threatening condition, many doctors thought there was nothing that could be done for Kelly Knight.

But the youngster became one of the first babies ever to have a liver transplant - thanks to pioneering work at Birmingham Children’s Hospital.

Fast forward to 2010 and Kelly was one of the guests of honour at a special event marking the liver unit’s 21st anniversary.

“My parents have told me how terrified they were when I had my transplant, but luckily I don’t remember anything about it myself,” said the cheerful youngster.

Kelly’s father John said that he and wife Debbie had been told at one point that their daughter was hours from death.

“I know it sounds corny, but you see films where everything slows down and you can see people speaking, but don’t hear what they say - well that’s exactly how it felt.

“In those days there wasn’t hope for children who needed liver transplants, but it’s thanks to the team at the hospital that Kelly is with us today.”

Kelly had been diagnosed with a liver condition when she was just seven-weeks old.

At the time, the prognosis was bad - but Professor Deidre Kelly had defied medical opinion and set up the country’s first stand-alone liver unit, especially for children.

But even before the procedure could take place, the family faced an agonising wait to see if an organ would become available.

An eight-hour operation followed and baby Kelly gradually recovered from her ordeal.

Last week the Chelmsley Wood family were invited to a special event at Birmingham Botanical Gardens - attended by some of the others who had received a transplant 21-years-ago.

 

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