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Kenny's goal is to find England 1966 tie-pins

When this thumbnail sized, gold World Cup was crafted in Birmingham – one of only five made – it cost the princely sum of £2.50.

Kenny Allen with one of the tiny gold tie pin replicas of the original World Cup trophy
Kenny Allen with one of the tiny gold tie pin replicas of the original World Cup trophy

When this thumbnail sized, gold World Cup was crafted in Birmingham – one of only five made – it cost the princely sum of £2.50.

Forty-eight years on, the tie-pins – produced in the Jewellery Quarter to celebrate England’s famous 1966 World Cup success – could fetch between £3,000 and £4,000.

With the most famous football tournament once again beckoning, Kenny Allen – the Shirley pensioner who commissioned the Jules Rimet miniatures – is trying to track them down.

He knows the whereabouts of three, but has drawn a blank over the rest of the set. Former bookie Kenny still has one and knows that two of them went to relatives.

The 76-year-old recalled approaching a craftsman friend to create the tributes during the famous football campaign, hosted by this country. England lifted the real trophy by beating West Germany 4-2, Geoff Hurst’s late goal spawning one of the most famous lines in sporting history. BBC commentator Kenneth Wolstenholme told an ecstatic nation: “They think it’s all over...it is now.”

“My friend worked in the Jewellery Quarter at the time,” Kenny told the Solihull News.

“I said to him, ‘come on we need to get some of these cups made for the World Cup’.

“Next thing you know, he comes back to me with some. They cost about £2.50 each at the time.

“With the World Cup coming up this year, it would be great to know where the other two went.

“I don’t want to buy them, I don’t think whoever has them would sell them anyway, but it would just be interesting to know where they are now.”

Kenny is a lifelong racing enthusiast. His father-in-law, Jimmy Jackson, used to be one of the biggest bookmakers in Birmingham and ran up to six offices in Solihull.

He was the first bookmaker in the town.

Kenny used to sell fruit at Birmingham markets for 35 years and has also worked at Bromford Bridge race track.

He has sold various memorabilia in the past to raise money for charity.

Do you know where the World Cups are? If so, contact annette.belcher@trinitymirror.com

 

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Cathrina Hulse
Multimedia Journalist
Annette Belcher
Multimedia Journalist
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