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Solihull-based cancer charity demands help from Government

Members of the Oesophageal Patients Association, based in Solihull, travelled to London to join other charities from across the country as part of a campaign to raise more awareness of this type of cancer.

Loraine Ruddle, Oesophageal Patients Association (OPA) trustee, joins the rally at the House of Commons.
Loraine Ruddle, Oesophageal Patients Association (OPA) trustee, joins the rally at the House of Commons.

Members of a cancer charity descended on the House of Commons this week to demand the Government’s help with raising more awareness of oesophageal cancer.

Members of the Oesophageal Patients Association (OPA), which is based in Solihull, travelled to London to join other charities from across the country as part of a campaign to raise more awareness of this type of cancer.

The rally, which took place at Westminster on Monday aimed to bring attention to the life- saving opportunities possible through earlier diagnosis and treatment of Barrett’s Oesophagus as an important ‘pre-cursor’ for oesophageal cancer – now one of the fastest rising cancers.

OPA trustee Loraine Ruddle said: “The day was extremely well attended, nationally as well as from the Solihull area.

“The day was all about lobbying Parliament to improve the awareness of oesophageal cancer by increasing funding and awareness campaigns.”

The OPA has already succeeded in securing further national awareness campaigns, like the Be Clear on Cancer campaign but Loraine said more work needs to be done.

“This is a start but we will continue to campaign for more from the Government and get across this very important message.”

MP David Heyes and trustee of the OPA added: “Having led the fight against this devastating disease for almost thirty years, The OPA believes passionately that oesophageal cancer must now receive MP’s attention as a significant public health issue. We welcome the chance to join this campaign. We hope the rally will result in the Government taking seriously the importance of promoting public awareness of this lesser known but rapidly increasing cancer. Many more lives could be saved through earlier diagnosis and better treatment.”

 

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