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Dad's cheeky poster has serious health message

Mahendra Dabhi appears on a series of posters and digital ads around the Midlands alongside the humorous message: “I’m regular as clockwork.”

Mahendra Dabhi has become the face of a new cheeky poster campaign to help raise awareness of the symptoms of cancer.
Mahendra Dabhi has become the face of a new cheeky poster campaign to help raise awareness of the symptoms of cancer.

A Solihull dad has become the face of a new cheeky poster campaign to help raise awareness of the symptoms of cancer.

Mahendra Dabhi appears on a series of posters and digital ads around the Midlands alongside the humorous message: “I’m regular as clockwork.”

The initiative is part of Cancer Research UK’s new Spot Cancer Sooner campaign, which aims to encourage people to know their bodies so they’re more likely to notice changes.

Mahendra, a dad-of-two from Kineton Green Road, decided to get involved with the campaign after losing two members of his family to the disease.

“I think it’s really important to know your own body and not be embarrassed to talk about it. The key thing is to know what’s normal for you,” said the 58-year-old.

“I have had two people in the family who have succumbed to cancer.

“My father-in-law, Narendra, passed away from bowel cancer ten years ago and my aunt, Kusum, also died from cancer more than 20 years ago.

“So I was delighted to be involved in Cancer Research UK’s Spot Cancer Sooner campaign after being approached to be on a poster.

“I am looking forward to seeing myself on one of them.”

The IT project manager began checking his body after discovering a mole on his back more than 25 years ago.

“I went to have it checked out by my local GP and have been keeping an eye on it ever since,” he added.

“It is very important that people know their own body and notice any unusual changes.”

The campaign’s ‘stars’ were selected following two days of filming in Birmingham city centre in December.

Martin Ledwick, Head Information Nurse for Cancer Research UK, said: “It’s really important to know what is normal for your body and not be afraid to discuss any changes you notice.

“It is important to act early in the fight against cancer.

“That means not being embarrassed to talk about your body.”

 

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