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Stroke victim Jenny Morgan hits out after lengthy wait at Solihull Hospital

A HOCKLEY Heath woman was convinced she was going to die after being left waiting for more than 90 minutes at Solihull Hospital’s medical assessment unit, even though she had suffered a stroke.

stroke

A HOCKLEY Heath woman was convinced she was going to die after being left waiting for more than 90 minutes at Solihull Hospital’s medical assessment unit, even though she had suffered a stroke.

Jenny Morgan was rushed to the hospital in November last year - she was complaining of vision loss, paralysis down the left-hand side and a terrible headache.

Now the 58-year-old has blasted hospital procedure and demands to know why she wasn’t treated on arrival.

Eventually the pain became intolerable and Mrs Morgan, unable to wait any longer, went home. The symptoms gradually subsided, but a CT scan has since revealed she had a stroke.

“In the end I felt so ill that I had to get out of there,” she said. “I couldn’t bear the lights, I couldn’t bear the noise and in the end I just got in the car with my husband and we went home. When you feel like that, you don’t think rationally.

“Thankfully there have been no side-effects, but I was incredibly lucky. When I arrived I could barely stand or talk and yet they thought it was okay for me to sit in a waiting room for that length of time. I want a proper apology from them and a promise that they will change their procedure.”

Following her ordeal, Mrs Morgan wrote a letter of complaint to the hospital’s chief executive Mark Goldman. Last week she received a reply from the Heart of England Foundation Trust, which said that on the day in question, staff had had to deal with a number of seriously-ill patients who had arrived by ambulance.

Mrs Morgan - who had previously suffered a stroke in 2000 - said that the explanation wasn’t good enough and that she was considering taking legal action.

“I could have died. I realise hospitals get busy, but they should have seen me and assessed me properly when I arrived. They are putting people’s lives at risk.”

Lisa Dunn, hospital director, said that the condition of all patients waiting to be admitted to a ward was constantly monitered

“We are sorry to learn of Mrs Morgan’s concerns. Unfortunately, due to patient confidentiality, we cannot comment on any individual patient’s treatment. We endeavour to maintain the highest standards of care and aim to see, treat and either discharge or admit 98 per cent of patients within four hours of admission to A&E."

 

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