How we use Cookies

Vandals spoil vintage station waiting room

Just weeks after a new vintage waiting room at Dorridge Station was unveiled, two acts of vandalism over Easter have led to its closure.

1930's station waiting room at Dorridge Station
1930's station waiting room at Dorridge Station

Just weeks after a new vintage waiting room at Dorridge Station was unveiled, two acts of vandalism over Easter have led to its closure.

Part of a £16,000 community project, volunteer group Friends of Dorridge Station unveiled the restored room, which boasts old GWR fittings and posters, on March 24.

But over Easter vandals scratched ‘Dave’ into a fire place and mirror at the waiting room causing several hundred pounds worth of damage.

A notice – now removed – at the station told passengers: “On two separate occasions this tag has been scratched into the fireplace and mirror at the newly opened waiting room at Dorridge Station.

“If anyone recognises it and can identify the author would they please e-mail fods.93@gmail.com”

The Knowle and Dorridge Police Team and British Transport Police have both been informed and are in possession of the image.

The waiting room is now closed until repairs have been carried out and security measures installed.

The area was restored by the Friends of Dorridge Station with support from groups including Chiltern Railways and Centro as well as local businesses the Forest and Heather’s Kitchen.

Ian Spencer, from Dorridge and District Residents Association, who also contributed to the project, said on its website: “Dorridge isn’t a place that suffers much from vandalism, the young people who live around here generally are sensible and caring about the place where they live.

“After putting a lot of hard work into the station waiting room, the Friends of Dorridge Station were understandably upset when a mindless vandal in a few seconds of thoughtlessness caused several hundred pounds worth of damage, scratching a tag onto surfaces in the waiting room.”

Dorridge Station, which is now owned by Network Rail and operated by Chiltern Railways, was built by Isambard Kingdom Brunel in 1852 when the line was opened by the Great Western Railway.

 

Journalists

Cathrina Hulse
Multimedia Journalist
Annette Belcher
Multimedia Journalist
Full newsroom contact details
Tell us what's happening in your area.